Term   

Term

Commens
Digital Companion to C. S. Peirce
Term
1899-1900 [c.] | Notes on Topical Geometry | MS [R] 142:6

Symbols are of three classes: terms, which call attention to things or quasi-things; propositions, which declare facts; and arguments, which profess to enlighten us as to the rational connections of facts or possible facts.

1901-1902 [c.] | Definitions for Baldwin's Dictionary [R] | MS [R] 1147

a term is a symbol with both interpretant and object left blank.

1901-1902 [c.] | Definitions for Baldwin's Dictionary [R] | MS [R] 1147

A term appears, in the general algebra of logic of Peirce, as well as in the logical graphs of the same logician, as a symbol which does not definitely and separately show its object, or more clearly speaking, as a proposition in which blanks are left for some or all of its subjects; as ‘– is a man,’ ‘– loves –.’

1903 [c.] | Logical Tracts. No. 1. On Existential Graphs | MS [R] 491:9

A term […] is any representamen which does not separately indicate its object; as ‘kills’, ‘digs’, ‘endowed by nature with rich gifts of person and mind, and a really great poet, but vicious and egotistical’.